10/26 GWIKS Interview Series with Wendy Cutler (ESIA BA ’79)

The GW Institute for Korean Studies Presents:

GWIKS Interview Series with Wendy Cutler (ESIA BA ’79)

Speaker: Wendy Cutler (ESIA BA ’79)

Monday, October 26, 2020

2:00 PM – 2:40 PM EDT

Virtual Event

This event is on the record and open to the public.

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Event Description

Please join the GW Institute for Korean Studies (GWIKS) for a live interview with Wendy Cutler, Vice President of the Asia Society Policy Institute (ASPI). This event is part of our interview series with prominent GW alumni working in the policy fields. As a former top U.S. trade negotiator, Wendy Cutler will provide her views on the new challenges for trade and investment in the Asia-Pacific region. She will also share the highlights of her days at GW and provide career advice to students.

Speaker

Wendy Cutler (ESIA BA ’79) joined the Asia Society Policy Institute (ASPI) as vice president in November 2015. She also serves as the managing director of the Washington D.C. Office. In these roles, she focuses on building ASPI’s presence in Washington — strengthening its outreach as a think/do tank — and on leading initiatives that address challenges related to trade and investment, as well as women’s empowerment in Asia. She joined ASPI following an illustrious career of nearly three decades as a diplomat and negotiator in the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR). Most recently she served as Acting Deputy U.S. Trade Representative, working on a range of U.S. trade negotiations and initiatives in the Asia-Pacific region. In that capacity she was responsible for the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement, including the bilateral negotiations with Japan. She also was the chief negotiator to the U.S.-Korea (KORUS) Free Trade Agreement.

Moderator

Yonho Kim is Associate Research Professor of Practice and Associate Director of GW Institute for Korean Studies. He specializes in North Korea’s mobile telecommunications and U.S. policy towards North Korea. Kim is the author of North Korean Phone Money: Airtime Transfers as a Precursor to Mobile Payment System (2020), North Korea’s Mobile Telecommunications and Private Transportation Services in the Kim Jong-un Era (2019), and Cell Phones in North Korea: Has North Korea Entered the Telecommunications Revolution? (2014). His research findings were covered by various media outlets, including Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, Yonhap News, and Libération. Prior to joining GWIKS, he extensively interacted with the Washington policy circle on the Korean peninsula as Senior Researcher of the US-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, Senior Reporter for Voice of America’s Korean Service, and Assistant Director of the Atlantic Council’s Program on Korea in Transition. He holds a B.A. and M.A. in International Relations from Seoul National University, and an M.A. in International Relations and International Economics from Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies.

 

GW Institute for Korean Studies

10/28 U.S.-ROK-Japan Trilateral Relations in the Post-Abe Era

Wednesday, October 28, 2020

10:00 AM – 11:30 AM EDT

Virtual Event

This event is on the record and open to the public.

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Event Description

Japan’s new Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga inherited ongoing challenges for the U.S.-South Korean-Japanese trilateral relations from his predecessor Shinzo Abe. Although both Tokyo and Seoul are not willing to change their existing policy lines in the short-run, the political need for a refreshed approach to Korea-Japan relations would emerge as both countries struggle with the unprecedented challenges in the COVID-19 pandemic and wait for the results of the U.S. elections in November. Please join GW Institute for Korean Studies for an online discussion on the trilateral relations in the post-Abe era. The speakers will discuss prospects of the civil society activism on the Korean Supreme Court’s ruling, Korea and Japan’s domestic politics and the trilateral relations and a U.S. view of the trilateral relations.

 

Speakers (Alphabetical Order)

Celeste Arrington (left) is Korea Foundation Associate Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at GW. She specializes in comparative politics, with a regional focus on the Koreas and Japan. Her research and teaching focus on law and social movements, the media, lawyers, policy processes, historical justice, North Korean human rights, and qualitative methods. She is also interested in the international relations and security of Northeast Asia and transnational activism. She is the author of Accidental Activists: Victims and Government Accountability in South Korea and Japan (2016) and has published in Comparative Political Studies, Law & Society Review, Journal of East Asian Studies, Pacific Affairs, Asian Survey, and the Washington Post, among others. She received a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, an MPhil from the University of Cambridge, and an A.B. from Princeton University. She is currently writing a book that analyzes the role of lawyers and legal activism in Japanese and Korean policies related to persons with disabilities and tobacco control.

Emma Chanlett-Avery (second to left) is a Specialist in Asian Affairs at the Congressional Research Service. She focuses on U.S. relations with Japan, the Korean Peninsula, Thailand, and Singapore. Ms. Chanlett-Avery joined CRS in 2003 through the Presidential Management Fellowship, with rotations in the State Department on the Korea Desk and at the Joint U.S. Military Advisory Group in Bangkok, Thailand. She also worked in the Office of Policy Planning as a Harold Rosenthal Fellow. She is a member of the Mansfield Foundation U.S. – Japan Network for the Future, Vice-Chair of the Board of Trustees of the Japan America Society of Washington, and the 2016 recipient of the Kato Prize. Ms. Chanlett-Avery received an MA in international security policy from the School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University and her BA in Russian studies from Amherst College.

James L. Schoff (second to right) is a senior fellow in the Carnegie Asia Program. His research focuses on U.S.-Japan relations and regional engagement, East Asian security, and alliance collaboration in high-tech fields. Before joining Carnegie in 2012, Schoff served as senior adviser for East Asia policy at the U.S. Office of the Secretary of Defense, where he was responsible for strategic planning and policy development for relations with Japan and the Republic of Korea. He also spearheaded extended deterrence dialogues and contributed to trilateral security cooperation initiatives. Before then he served as director of Asia Pacific Studies at the Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Schoff’s publications include “U.S.-Japan Technology Policy Coordination: Balancing Technonationalism with a Globalized World” (Carnegie, 2020), Uncommon Alliance for the Common Good: The United States and Japan after the Cold War (Carnegie, 2017), and Tools for Trilateralism: Improving U.S.-Japan-Korea Cooperation to Manage Complex Contingencies (Potomac Books Inc., 2005). Schoff earned a Masters Degree from Johns Hopkins’ School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) and a Bachelors Degree in Japanese history from Duke University (including a year at International Christian University in Japan).

Yong-Chool Ha (right), a Russia and Korea specialist, is Korea Foundation Professor at the Jackson School of International Studies, University of Washington. He is Professor emeritus of Seoul National University. He visited North Korea three times and has written on North Korea, South Korea, East Asia and Russian foreign policy. Beyond writings on international issues, he has a broader academic interest in comparative study of late industrialization and social change. His research interests are community building and international relations theories, late industrialization and international relations, and changing elite-mass relations in late industrializing countries. Currently he is finishing a book on “Late Industrialization, the State and Social Change in a Comparative Perspective.”His recent publications include: The Dynamics of Strong State (SNU Press, 2006), Late Industrialization, the State and Tradition: the Emergence of Neofamilism in Korea (2007, CPS), Colonial Social Change (ed.)(U. of Washington Press, 2013), and The International Impact of the Colonial Rule in Korea (UW Press, 2019).

 

Moderator

Yonho Kim is Associate Research Professor of Practice and Associate Director of GW Institute for Korean Studies. He specializes in North Korea’s mobile telecommunications and U.S. policy towards North Korea. Kim is the author of North Korean Phone Money: Airtime Transfers as a Precursor to Mobile Payment System (2020), North Korea’s Mobile Telecommunications and Private Transportation Services in the Kim Jong-un Era (2019) and Cell Phones in North Korea: Has North Korea Entered the Telecommunications Revolution? (2014). His research findings were covered by various media outlets, including Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, Yonhap News, and Libération. Prior to joining GWIKS, he extensively interacted with the Washington policy circle on the Korean peninsula as Senior Researcher of the U.S.-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, Senior Reporter for Voice of America’s Korean Service, and Assistant Director of the Atlantic Council’s Program on Korea in Transition. He holds a B.A. and M.A. in International Relations from Seoul National University, and an M.A. in International Relations and International Economics from Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies.

 

Korean woman in the 1950s leaning against car

10/30 Cold War Cosmopolitanism: Period Style in 1950s Korean Cinema

Soh Jaipil Lecture Series

Speaker

Christina Klein, Associate Professor of English and Director of American Studies, Boston College

Moderator

Immanuel Kim, Korea Foundation and Kim-Renaud Associate Professor of Korean Literature and Culture Studies,
the George Washington University

Date&Time

Friday, October 30, 2020
2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

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Event Description

South Korea in the 1950s was home to a burgeoning film culture, one of the many “Golden Age cinemas” that flourished in Asia during the postwar years. Cold War Cosmopolitanism offers a transnational cultural history of South Korean film style in this period, focusing on the works of Han Hyung-mo, director of the era’s most glamorous and popular women’s pictures, including the blockbuster Madame Freedom (1956). Christina Klein provides a unique approach to the study of film style, illuminating how Han’s films took shape within a “free world” network of aesthetic and material ties created by the legacies of Japanese colonialism, the construction of US military bases, the waging of the cultural Cold War, the forging of regional political alliances, and the import of popular cultures from around the world.

Speaker

Christina Klein holds a BA in Film Studies from Wesleyan and Ph.D. in American Studies from Yale. In addition to her new book, Cold War Cosmopolitanism, which was just published by the University of California Press, she is the author of Cold War Orientalism: Asia in the Middlebrow Imagination, 1945-1961 (California, 2003). Her articles on Korean and other Asian cinemas have been published in The Journal of Korean Studies, Transnational Cinemas, American Quarterly, Journal of Chinese Cinemas, Comparative American Studies, and Cinema Journal. She teaches film, English, and American Studies at Boston College.

 

 

Moderator

Immanuel Kim is Korea Foundation and Kim-Renaud Associate Professor of Korean Literature and Culture Studies. Prior to working at the George Washington University, he was Assistant Professor in the Department of Asian and Asian American Studies at Binghamton University (SUNY).  Dr. Kim received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Riverside. He is an authority on North Korean literature and film and is the author of a recent book on North Korean literature, Rewriting Revolution: Women, Sexuality, and Memory in North Korean Fiction (University of Hawaii Press, 2018).

 

 

GW Institute for Korean Studies

11/6 The 28th Annual Hahn Moo-Sook Colloquium in the Korean Humanities

Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures present:

The 28th Annual Hahn Moo-Sook Colloquium
in the Korean Humanities
From Enmity to Empathy:
African American and Korean American Communities
Since the 1992 Los Angeles Riots

Friday, November 6, 2020
3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time
Virtual Event via Zoom

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Co-organized by the GW Institute for Korean Studies, and co-sponsored by the Korea Foundation, GW Sigur Center for Asian Studies, and GW East Asia National Resource Center

Reflecting the current social injustice and the Black Lives Matter movement in the U.S., this year’s Hahn Moo-Sook colloquium will examine the myriad ways that race impacts Korean/Korean-American and African-American and the African diasporic communities related to the important conversation on racism and social injustice. In doing so, we begin examining from the 1992 LA riots and how the two communities have evolved since then. The speakers will examine Black-Korean tensions, what it means to be Korean-American in relation to multicultural politics and race, how we can situate Asian/Korean American experiences within the context of black-white paradigm, how the music genre of R&B and hip hop has brought the two communities closer through K-pop, and how the collaboration of cultural production influence and interrogate their respective cultures.

PROGRAM

Welcoming Remarks
3:00 p.m. – 3:05 p.m.
Jisoo M. Kim (Director, GW Institute for Korean Studies)
3:05 p.m. – 3:10 p.m.
Caroline Laguerre-Brown (Vice Provost for Diversity, Equity and Community Engagement, the George Washington University)

Main Session
3:10 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Kyeyoung Park (Professor of Anthropology and Asian American Studies, University of California, Los Angeles)
How Has Black-Korean Relations Evolved since the 1992 Los Angeles Civil Unrest?
3:30 p.m. – 3:50 p.m.
Edward Chang (Professor & Founding Director, Young Oak Kim Center for Korean American Studies, University of California, Riverside)
Confronting Sa-I-Gu: Beyond Black-Korean Conflict
3:50 p.m. – 4:10 p.m.
Crystal S. Anderson (Affiliate Faculty in Korean Studies, George Mason University) Groovy Everywhere: Korean R&B/Hip-Hop as a Site of Cultural Community
4:10 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Aku Kadogo (Chair of Department of Theater and Performance, Spelman College)
Confluence: Where the Mississippi Meets the Han

General discussions
4:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
This event is on the record and open to the public.

The Hahn Moo-Sook (HMS) Colloquium in the Korean Humanities series at the George Washington University provides a forum for academic discussion of Korean arts, history, language, literature thought and religious systems in the context of East Asia and the world. The colloquium series is made possible by an endowment established by the estate of Hahn Moo-Sook (1918-1993), one of Korea’s most honored writers, to uphold her spirit of openness, curiosity, and commitment to education.

For more information about the HMS Colloquium, visit here.

11/20 The Survival of the Chosŏn Dynasty in the Imjin War (1592-98) and the Issue of Governance

Soh Jaipil Lecture Series

Speaker

Nam-lin Hur, Professor, the University of British Columbia

Moderator

    Jisoo M. Kim, Director, GW Institute for Korean Studies

Date & Time

Friday, November 20, 2020

3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

 

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Event Description

Within three weeks of the invasion, the Japanese took Hansŏng, the capital of Chosŏn, and King Sŏnjo fled to the north. Japan’s sudden invasion dealt a blow of life or death to the dynasty King Sŏnjo had inherited. Seven years later, Japan’s invader regime gave up the war without achieving anything and, two years later, it collapsed. Ming China which sent a rescue force to Korea suffered heavy casualties and financial losses. A few decades later, it also collapsed. But the Chosŏn dynasty survived and enjoyed longevity for three more centuries. The war unfolded in Korea only. What helped the Chosŏn dynasty survive the crisis? The avenues of Chosŏn Korea’s survival were two: military and diplomatic. In this talk, Hur examines the ways in which the military avenue contributed to the survival of the Chosŏn dynasty. From the beginning to the end, King Sŏnjo was determined to destroy the Japanese invaders even though his country’s military capability was not a match. In 1592, the most critical year, Chosŏn Korea had already been able to frustrate Hideyoshi’s goals far before Ming China committed a large rescue force. In 1593, Ming China, which failed to strike the Japanese out, sought a negotiated settlement to the war to 1596, but to no avail. In 1597 the Japanese resumed a massive attack on the Chosŏn, and the Ming sent a larger force. The Ming force depended on supplies which the Chosŏn procured (to a great extent) and transported to the front. How was Chosŏn Korea able to do the job that contributed to frustrate the Japanese? In answering these questions, Hur pays attention to the modus operandi of Chosŏn Korea’s governance.

Speaker

Nam-lin Hur (Ph.D., Princeton) is a professor in the Department of Asian Studies, The University of British Columbia. His teaching focuses upon premodern Japanese history and international relations in premodern East Asia. His major publications include: Prayer and Play in Late Tokugawa Japan: Asakusa Sensōji and Edo Society (Harvard University Asia Center, 2000); Death and Social Order in Tokugawa Japan: Buddhism, Anti-Christianity, and the Danka System (Harvard University Asia Center, 2007); “National Defense in Shambles: Wartime Military Build-up in Chosŏn Korea, 1592-98,” Seoul Journal of Korean Studies 22/2 (2009); “The Celestial Warriors: Ming Military Aid and Abuse during the Korean War, 1592-98” in The East Asian War, 1592-1598: International Relations, Violence, and Memory (Routledge, 2015); and “Toyotomi Hideyoshi’s Invasion of the Chosŏn Kingdom, 1592-1598” in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Asian History (Oxford University Press, 2019). Currently, Hur is writing a book on Japan’s invasion of Chosŏn Korea in 1592-1598 and Ming China’s involvement.

Moderator

jkJisoo M. Kim is Korea Foundation Associate Professor of History, International Affairs, and East Asian Languages and Literatures and Director of the Institute for Korean Studies at GW. She also currently serves as Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Korean Studies. She is a specialist in gender, law, and emotions in Korean history. Her broader research interests include gender and sexuality, crime and justice, forensic medicine, literary representations of the law, history of emotions, vernacular, and gender writing. She is the author of The Emotions of Justice: Gender, Status, and Legal Performance in Chosŏn Korea (University of Washington Press, 2015), which was awarded the 2017 James Palais Prize of the Association for Asian Studies. She is also the co-editor of The Great East Asian War and the Birth of the Korean Nation by JaHyun Kim Haboush (Columbia University Press, 2016). She is currently working on a book project tentatively entitled Sexual Desire, Crime, and Gendered Subjects: A History of Adultery Law in Korea. She received her M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D. in East Asian Languages and Cultures from Columbia University.

 

GW Institute for Korean Studies

12/02 Dictator’s Modernity Dilemma: Development and Democracy in ROK, 1961-1987

Speaker: Dr. Joan Cho Wesleyan University

Wednesday, December 2, 2020

3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Eastern Time

Virtual Event via Zoom

This event is on the record and open to the public.

Registration

Event Description

Dictator’s Modernity Dilemma: Development and Democracy in South Korea, 1961-1987 aims to reconcile the two seemingly contradictory views regarding Korea’s path to modernity and democracy. At first blush, South Korea illustrates the basic premise of modernization theory: economic development leads to democracy. However, under Park Chung Hee (1961-1979) and Chun Doo Hwan (1980-1988), Korea’s political system became increasingly authoritarian alongside the growth of the national economy. These South Korean autocrats sought legitimacy of their coup-born regimes by holding legislative elections and investing in economic development. In this book project, I argue and demonstrate that the structural foundations of modernization (industrial complexes and higher education in particular) had an initial stabilizing effect on authoritarian rule by increasing regime support, but also contributed to the development of mobilizing structures for anti-regime protests in the 1970s and 1980s. By highlighting the differential impacts of modernization structures over time, this research shows how socioeconomic development acted as a “double-edged sword” by stabilizing the regimes at first, but destabilizing the dictatorship over time.

Speaker

Dr. Joan Cho is an Assistant Professor of East Asian Studies and Government at Wesleyan University. Cho specializes in authoritarianism, democratization, social movements, and authoritarian legacies in Korea and East Asia. Her research on authoritarian regime support, South Korean democracy movement, and electoral accountability in post-transition South Korea are published in Electoral Studies, Journal of East Asian Studies, Studies in Comparative International Development, and Routledge Handbook of Korean Culture and Society. Cho’s other writings have appeared in the Pacific Affairs and The Conversation. Dr. Cho received her Ph.D. and A.M. degrees in Political Science from the Department of Government at Harvard University and a B.A. (cum laude with honors) in Political Science from the University of Rochester. She is an Associate-in-research of the Council of East Asian Studies at Yale University, Executive Secretary of the Association of Korean Political Studies, and a 2018-2019 U.S.-Korea NextGen Scholar. Cho previously held visiting fellow positions at the Asiatic Research Institute at Korea University, Taiwan Foundation for Democracy, and the Center for International Studies at Seoul National University.

Moderator 

Jisoo M. Kim is Korea Foundation Associate Professor of History, International Affairs, and East Asian Languages and Literatures and Director of the Institute for Korean Studies at GW. She also currently serves as Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Korean Studies. She is a specialist in gender, law, and emotions in Korean history. Her broader research interests include gender and sexuality, crime and justice, forensic medicine, literary representations of the law, history of emotions, vernacular, and gender writing. She is the author of The Emotions of Justice: Gender, Status, and Legal Performance in Chosŏn Korea (University of Washington Press, 2015), which was awarded the 2017 James Palais Prize of the Association for Asian Studies. She is also the co-editor of The Great East Asian War and the Birth of the Korean Nation by JaHyun Kim Haboush (Columbia University Press, 2016). She is currently working on a book project tentatively entitled Sexual Desire, Crime, and Gendered Subjects: A History of Adultery Law in Korea. She received her M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D. in East Asian Languages and Cultures from Columbia University.

 

the korean vernacular story

3/21 Vernacular Eloquence of Chosŏn Korea Beyond the Korean Script

Soh Jaipil Lecture Series

 

Speaker

Si Nae Park, Associate Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

Moderator

Jisoo Kim, Director, GW Institute for Korean Studies; Co-Director, East Asia NRC

Date & Time

Thursday, March 11, 2021 4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Eastern Time

Virtual Event

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Event Description

In this presentation, Si Nae Park introduces her book The Korean Vernacular Story: Telling Tales of Contemporary Chosŏn in Sinographic Writing (Columbia University, 2020), the first book in the English language on the late Chosŏn literary genre of yadam. The presentation has two components. First, Park highlights key points of her book: how the culture of eighteenth-century Seoul as the political, economic, and cultural center of Chosŏn Korea (1392–1910) gave rise to a new vernacular narrative form that was evocative of the spoken and written Korean language of the time, and how yadam narratives spread in the late Chosŏn culture of texts. Next, Park discusses the book’s implication as a research project that extricates the genre of yadam from the nation-centered literary historiography (kungmunhak) of the 20th century, and puts forward a need to consider vernacular eloquence beyond the Korean script and script-focused linguistic nationalism.

Speaker

Si Nae Park is Associate Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University. She studies the literature, culture of texts, history of writing and reading, and linguistic thought of Korea within the larger context of the Sinographic Cosmopolis. Park’s research specializes in the role of linguistic sensibilities in perception, conceptualization, production and diffusion of literature, literary historiography, and canon formation. Currently, Park is working on her second monograph to examine the impact of aurality on literature with a focus on Chosŏn vernacular novels (ŏnmun sosŏl) as vocalized books. Her first book, The Korean Vernacular Story: Telling Tales of Contemporary Chosŏn in Sinographic Writing (Columbia University, 2020), explores the rise of the vernacular story genre (yadam) in sinographic writing, challenging the script (han’gŭl)-focused approach to 20th-century Korean language and literature. Park the co-editor of Score One for the Dancing Girl and Other Stories from the ‘Kimun ch’onghwa’: A Story Collection from Nineteenth-Century Korea (University of Toronto Press, 2016).

Moderator

Jisoo M. Kim is Korea Foundation Associate Professor of History, International Affairs, and East Asian Languages and Literatures and Director of the Institute for Korean Studies at GW. She also currently serves as Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Korean Studies. She is a specialist in gender, law, and emotions in Korean history. Her broader research interests include gender and sexuality, crime and justice, forensic medicine, literary representations of the law, history of emotions, vernacular, and gender writing. She is the author of The Emotions of Justice: Gender, Status, and Legal Performance in Chosŏn Korea (University of Washington Press, 2015), which was awarded the 2017 James Palais Prize of the Association for Asian Studies. She is also the co-editor of The Great East Asian War and the Birth of the Korean Nation by JaHyun Kim Haboush (Columbia University Press, 2016). She is currently working on a book project tentatively entitled Sexual Desire, Crime, and Gendered Subjects: A History of Adultery Law in Korea. She received her M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D. in East Asian Languages and Cultures from Columbia University.

GW Institute for Korean Studies

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