Book cover of: Samsung Rising by Geoffrey Cain, ESIA BA '08

[CANCELED] 3/24 Samsung Rising: The Inside Story of the South Korean Giant That Set Out to Beat Apple and Conquer Tech

GWIKS NRC

The GW Institute for Korean Studies & the East Asia National Resource Center Present:

Korea Policy Forum Alumnus Book Talk

“Samsung Rising:
The Inside Story of the South Korean Giant That Set Out to Beat Apple and Conquer Tech

Author

Geoffrey Cain, ESIA BA ’08
Former Foreign Correspondent, The Economist

Moderator

  Yonho Kim
Associate Director, GW Institute for Korean Studies

Date & Time

Tuesday, March 24, 2020
2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Location

Room 505, Elliott School of International Affairs, the George Washington University
1957 E Street, NW, Washington, DC 20052

RSVP

About the Book

Based on years of reporting on Samsung for The Economist, The Wall Street Journal, and Time, from his base in South Korea, and his countless sources inside and outside the company, Geoffrey Cain offers a penetrating look behind the curtains of the biggest company nobody in America knows. Seen for decades in tech circles as a fast follower rather than an innovation leader, Samsung today has grown to become a market leader in the United States and around the globe. They have captured one quarter of the smartphone market and have been pushing the envelope on every front.

A sweeping insider account of the Korean company’s ongoing war against the likes of Google and Apple, Samsung Rising shows how a determined and fearless Asian competitor has become a force to be reckoned with.

Author

Geoffrey Cain, ESIA BA ’08, is a foreign correspondent and author who has covered Asia and technology for The Economist, The Wall Street Journal, Time, The New Republic, and other publications. A resident of South Korea for five years and a Fulbright scholar, he studied at the School of Oriental and African Studies in London and the George Washington University. He is a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

 

 

 

Moderator

Yonho Kim is Associate Research Professor of Practice and Associate Director of GW Institute for Korean Studies. He specializes in North Korea’s mobile telecommunications and U.S. policy towards North Korea. Kim is the author of North Korea’s Mobile Telecommunications and Private Transportation Services in the Kim Jong-un Era (2019) and Cell Phones in North Korea: Has North Korea Entered the Telecommunications Revolution? (2014). His research findings were covered by various media outlets, including Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, Yonhap News, and Libération. Prior to joining GWIKS, he extensively interacted with the Washington policy circle on the Korean peninsula as Senior Researcher of the U.S.-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, Senior Reporter for Voice of America’s Korean Service, and Assistant Director of the Atlantic Council’s Program on Korea in Transition. He holds a B.A. and M.A. in International Relations from Seoul National University, and an M.A. in International Relations and International Economics from Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies.

 

This event is on the record and open to the public.

[CANCELED] 3/26 The Survival of the Chosŏn Dynasty in the Imjin War (1592-98) and the Issue of Governance

Speaker

Nam-lin Hur, Professor, the University of British Columbia

Moderator

    Jisoo M. Kim, Director, GW Institute for Korean Studies

Date & Time

Thursday, March 26, 2020
2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Location

Room 505, Elliott School of International Affairs,
the George Washington University, 1957 E Street, NW, Washington, DC 20052

RSVP

Event Description

Within three weeks of the invasion, the Japanese took Hansŏng, the capital of Chosŏn, and King Sŏnjo fled to the north. Japan’s sudden invasion dealt a blow of life or death to the dynasty King Sŏnjo had inherited. Seven years later, Japan’s invader regime gave up the war without achieving anything and, two years later, it collapsed. Ming China which sent a rescue force to Korea suffered heavy casualties and financial losses. A few decades later, it also collapsed. But the Chosŏn dynasty survived and enjoyed longevity for three more centuries. The war unfolded in Korea only. What helped the Chosŏn dynasty survive the crisis? The avenues of Chosŏn Korea’s survival were two: military and diplomatic.

In this talk, Hur examines the ways in which the military avenue contributed to the survival of the Chosŏn dynasty. From the beginning to the end, King Sŏnjo was determined to destroy the Japanese invaders even though his country’s military capability was not a match. In 1592, the most critical year, Chosŏn Korea had already been able to frustrate Hideyoshi’s goals far before Ming China committed a large rescue force. In 1593, Ming China, which failed to strike the Japanese out, sought a negotiated settlement to the war to 1596, but to no avail. In 1597 the Japanese resumed a massive attack on the Chosŏn, and the Ming sent a larger force. The Ming force depended on supplies which the Chosŏn procured (to a great extent) and transported to the front. How was Chosŏn Korea able to do the job that contributed to frustrate the Japanese? In answering these questions, Hur pays attention to the modus operandi of Chosŏn Korea’s governance.

Speaker

Nam-lin Hur (Ph.D., Princeton) is a professor in the Department of Asian Studies, The University of British Columbia. His teaching focuses upon premodern Japanese history and international relations in premodern East Asia. His major publications include: Prayer and Play in Late Tokugawa Japan: Asakusa Sensōji and Edo Society (Harvard University Asia Center, 2000); Death and Social Order in Tokugawa Japan: Buddhism, Anti-Christianity, and the Danka System (Harvard University Asia Center, 2007); “National Defense in Shambles: Wartime Military Build-up in Chosŏn Korea, 1592-98,” Seoul Journal of Korean Studies 22/2 (2009); “The Celestial Warriors: Ming Military Aid and Abuse during the Korean War, 1592-98” in The East Asian War, 1592-1598: International Relations, Violence, and Memory (Routledge, 2015); and “Toyotomi Hideyoshi’s Invasion of the Chosŏn Kingdom, 1592-1598” in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Asian History (Oxford University Press, 2019). Currently, Hur is writing a book on Japan’s invasion of Chosŏn Korea in 1592-1598 and Ming China’s involvement.

Moderator

jk

Jisoo M. Kim is Korea Foundation Associate Professor of History, International Affairs, and East Asian Languages and Literatures and Director of the Institute for Korean Studies at GW. She received her Ph.D. in Korean History from Columbia University. She is a specialist in gender and legal history of early modern Korea. Her broader research interests include gender and sexuality, crime and justice, forensic medicine, literary representations of the law, history of emotions, vernacular, and gender writing. She is the author of The Emotions of Justice: Gender, Status, and Legal Performance in Chosŏn Korea (University of Washington Press, 2015), which was awarded the 2017 James Palais Prize of the Association for Asian Studies. She is also the co-editor of The Great East Asian War and the Birth of the Korean Nation by JaHyun Kim Haboush (Columbia University Press, 2016). She is currently working on two book projects titled Suspicious Deaths: Forensic Medicine, Dead Bodies, and Criminal Justice in Chosŏn Korea and Sexual Desire and Gendered Subjects: Decriminalization of Adultery Law in Korean History.

This event is open to public and on the record.

Korean woman in the 1950s leaning against car

[CANCELED] 4/2 Cold War Cosmopolitanism: Period Style in 1950s Korean Cinema

GW Institute for Korean Studies

The GW Institute for Korean Studies Presents:

Soh Jaipil Lecture Series

Cold War Cosmopolitanism: Period Style in 1950s Korean Cinema

Speaker

Christina Klein, Associate Professor of English and Director of American Studies, Boston College

Moderator

Immanuel Kim, Korea Foundation and Kim-Renaud Associate Professor of Korean Literature and Culture Studies,
the George Washington University

Date&Time

Thursday, April 2, 2020
2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Location

Room 505, Elliott School of International Affairs,
the George Washington University, 1957 E Street, NW, Washington, DC 20052

RSVP

Event Description

South Korea in the 1950s was home to a burgeoning film culture, one of the many “Golden Age cinemas” that flourished in Asia during the postwar years. Cold War Cosmopolitanism offers a transnational cultural history of South Korean film style in this period, focusing on the works of Han Hyung-mo, director of the era’s most glamorous and popular women’s pictures, including the blockbuster Madame Freedom (1956). Christina Klein provides a unique approach to the study of film style, illuminating how Han’s films took shape within a “free world” network of aesthetic and material ties created by the legacies of Japanese colonialism, the construction of US military bases, the waging of the cultural Cold War, the forging of regional political alliances, and the import of popular cultures from around the world.

Speaker

Christina Klein holds a BA in Film Studies from Wesleyan and Ph.D. in American Studies from Yale. In addition to her new book, Cold War Cosmopolitanism, which was just published by the University of California Press, she is the author of Cold War Orientalism: Asia in the Middlebrow Imagination, 1945-1961 (California, 2003). Her articles on Korean and other Asian cinemas have been published in The Journal of Korean Studies, Transnational Cinemas, American Quarterly, Journal of Chinese Cinemas, Comparative American Studies, and Cinema Journal. She teaches film, English, and American Studies at Boston College.

 

 

Moderator

Immanuel Kim is Korea Foundation and Kim-Renaud Associate Professor of Korean Literature and Culture Studies. Prior to working at the George Washington University, he was Assistant Professor in the Department of Asian and Asian American Studies at Binghamton University (SUNY).  Dr. Kim received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Riverside. He is an authority on North Korean literature and film and is the author of a recent book on North Korean literature, Rewriting Revolution: Women, Sexuality, and Memory in North Korean Fiction (University of Hawaii Press, 2018).

 

 

 

This event is on the record and open to the public.

Book cover of: Interrogation rooms of the Korean War by Monica Kim

[CANCELED] 4/30 The Korean War through the Prism of the Interrogation Room

GW Institute for Korean Studies

The GW Institute for Korean Studies Presents:

Soh Jaipil Lecture Series

The Korean War through the Prism of the Interrogation Room

Speaker

Monica Kim, Assistant Professor in History, New York University

Moderator

Gregg A. Brazinsky, Deputy Director, GW Institute for Korean Studies

Date&Time

Thursday, April 30, 2020
2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Location

Room 505, Elliott School of International Affairs,
the George Washington University, 1957 E Street, NW, Washington, DC 20052

RSVP

Event Description

Through the interrogation rooms of the Korean War, this talk demonstrates how the individual human subject became both the terrain and the jus ad bellum for this critical U.S. war of ‘intervention’ in postcolonial Korea. In 1952, with the US introduction of voluntary POW repatriation proposal at Panmunjom, the interrogation room and the POW became a flashpoint for an international controversy ultimately about postcolonial sovereignty and political recognition.

The ambitions of empire, revolution and non-alignment converged upon this intimate encounter of military warfare: the interrogator and the interrogated prisoner of war. Which state could supposedly reinvent the most intimate power relation between the colonizer and the colonized, to transform the relationship between the state and subject into one of liberation, democracy or freedom? Tracing two generations of people across the Pacific as they navigate multiple kinds of interrogation from the 1940s and 1950s, this talk lay outs a landscape of interrogation – a dense network of violence, bureaucracy, and migration – that breaks apart the usual temporal bounds of the Korean War as a discrete event.

Speaker

Monica Kim is Assistant Professor in U.S. and the World History in the Department of History at New York University. Her book, The Interrogation Rooms of the Korean War: The Untold History (Princeton University Press), is a trans-Pacific history of decolonization told through the experiences of two generations of people creating and navigating military interrogation rooms of the Korean War. She has published work in journals such as Critical Asian Studies and positions: Asia critique concerning U.S. Empire, war-making, and decolonization. She is also a member of the Editorial Collective for Radical History Review. Her research and writing have been supported by fellowships from the Institute for Advanced Study, the Penn Humanities Forum at University of Pennsylvania, and the Korea Foundation.

 

Moderator

Gregg A. Brazinsky is Professor of History and International Affairs and Deputy Director of GW Institute for Korean Studies. His research seeks to understand the diverse and multi-faceted interactions among East Asian states and between Asia and the United States. He is the author of Nation Building in South Korea: Koreans, Americans, and the Making of a Democracy (University of North Carolina Press, 2007) and Winning the Third World: Sino-American Rivalry during the Cold War (University of North Carolina Press, 2017). He served as Interim Director of the GW Institute for Korean Studies during the Spring 2017 semester.

 

 

This event is open to public and on the record.

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