4/20 South Korea’s National Assembly Elections: Prospects of New Political Geography and Foreign Policy

GWIKS NRC

The GW Institute for Korean Studies & the East Asia National Resource Center Present:

Korea Policy Forum Webinar

“South Korea’s National Assembly Elections:
Prospects of New Political Geography and Foreign Policy”

Speakers

Stephen Costello, Non-Resident Scholar, GW Institute for Korean Studies

Celeste Arrington, Korea Foundation Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, George Washington University

Heung-Kyu Kim, Director of China Policy Institute, Ajou University

Moderator

   Yonho Kim, Associate Director, GW Institute for Korean Studies

Date & Time

Monday, April 20, 2020 9:15 a.m. – 10:30 am.

RSVP

Event Description

On April 15, South Korea will hold the general elections amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Not only the unprecedented fight against COVID-19 but also the new proportional representation system emerged as critical variables for the election results. What are the main political parties’ strategies and challenges leading up to the elections and how did they lead to the election outcome? How would the political landscape, including the power relations within the main political parties, be shifting in the coming months? What would be the potential impact of the election results on Seoul’s repositioning its foreign and security policy? Please join the GW Institute for Korean Studies for an online discussion with experts from both the U.S. and South Korea on the prospects of a new domestic political geography in South Korea and its potential impact on U.S.-ROK relations and Seoul’s North Korea policy.

Speakers

Stephen Costello has been immersed in South Korean politics and foreign policy since 1990. He is the Director of the policy NGO AsiaEast.Org and columnist with The Korea Times in Seoul. He holds a bachelor’s degree in Public Policy Analysis from Syracuse University. Mr. Costello was formerly director of the Korea Program at the Atlantic Council of the US and director of the Kim Dae Jung Peace Foundation/USA. He was a political consultant and policy advisor to overseas political parties and mayors, and Washington manager for overseas NGOs. He has consulted for small technology businesses in Korea and the US. He has advised ministers and staff at the Foreign and Unification ministries in Seoul and the State Department in Washington. Beyond South Korea, Costello’s focus includes the Korean Peninsula, Northeast Asia, and the US interests in the region.

Celeste Arrington is Korea Foundation Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at GW. She specializes in comparative politics, with a regional focus on the Koreas and Japan. Her research and teaching focus on law and social movements, the media, lawyers, policy processes, historical justice, North Korean human rights, and qualitative methods. She is also interested in the international relations and security of Northeast Asia and transnational activism. She is the author of Accidental Activists: Victims and Government Accountability in South Korea and Japan (2016) and has published in Comparative Political Studies, Law & Society Review, Journal of East Asian Studies, Pacific Affairs, Asian Survey, and the Washington Post, among others. She received a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, an MPhil from the University of Cambridge, and an A.B. from Princeton University. She is currently writing a book that analyzes the role of lawyers and legal activism in Japanese and Korean policies related to persons with disabilities and tobacco control.

Heung-Kyu Kim is the founder and Director of China Policy Institute and professor in the department of political science at Ajou University, South Korea. He also served as a professor at the Institute of Foreign Affairs and National Security, South Korea’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs. His current assignments include Policy Advisory Board Member for the Ministry of National Defense and the ROK Army and a member of the Foreign Ministry’s Reform Commission. He also served as Director of Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on the Presidential Commission on Policy Planning, Team Leader of Security and Defense in the Presidential Task Force of Future Vision 2045, a board member of the National Security Council and a board member of National Defense Reform Commission. Dr. Kim’s publications include China and the U.S.-ROK Alliance: Promoting a Trilateral Dialogue (CFR, 2017), Enemy, Homager or Equal Partner?: Evolving Korea-China Relations (2012), From a Buffer Zone to a Strategic Burden: Evolving Sino-North Korea Relations during Hu Jintao Era (2010). His book China’s Central-Local Relations and Decision-Making received an award for Excellency of the Year by the Ministry of Culture in 2008. He also received the NEAR Foundation Academic prize of the year in the area of foreign policy and security in 2014. Kim received his BA and MA in international relations from Seoul National University, South Korea, and Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Michigan.

Moderator

Yonho Kim is Associate Research Professor of Practice and Associate Director of GW Institute for Korean Studies. He specializes in North Korea’s mobile telecommunications and U.S. policy towards North Korea. Kim is the author of North Korea’s Mobile Telecommunications and Private Transportation Services in the Kim Jong-un Era (2019) and Cell Phones in North Korea: Has North Korea Entered the Telecommunications Revolution? (2014). His research findings were covered by various media outlets, including Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, Yonhap News, and Libération. Prior to joining GWIKS, he extensively interacted with the Washington policy circle on the Korean peninsula as Senior Researcher of the U.S.-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, Senior Reporter for Voice of America’s Korean Service, and Assistant Director of the Atlantic Council’s Program on Korea in Transition. He holds a B.A. and M.A. in International Relations from Seoul National University, and an M.A. in International Relations and International Economics from Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies.

Registered guests will receive a separate WebEx invitation email with details
for joining the event a day before the event.

This event is on the record and open to the public.

The Korea Policy Forum is made possible by a generous grant provided by the KDI School of Public Policy and Management.

4/23 South Korea’s Response to the Corona Virus: Public Health, ICT, and Economic Measures

GWIKS NRC

The GW Institute for Korean Studies & the East Asia National Resource Center Present:

Korea Policy Forum Webinar

“South Korea’s Response to the Corona Virus:
Public Health, ICT, and Economic Measures”

Speakers

Chang Huh, Ministry of Economy and Finance
Hee-Kwon Jung, Ministry of Science and ICT
Moran Ki, National Cancer Center Graduate School of Cancer Science and Policy

Moderator

   Yonho Kim, Associate Director, GW Institute for Korean Studies

Date & Time

Thursday, April 23, 2020 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 am.

RSVP

Event Description

As the world is reeling from the coronavirus pandemic, South Korea has emerged as a model of effective testing, contact tracing, and treatment. It is remarkable that South Korea succeeded in flattening the curve of new infections without lockdowns or travel restrictions. On April 15, South Koreans even held the world’s first general election in the coronavirus era with a record high turnout rate. As the U.S. is aiming to reopen the economy, the South Korean case would provide a rare example of how the coronavirus pandemic management could work.

Please join GW Institute for Korean Studies for an online discussion on South Korea’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic in the areas of public health measures, use of technology and data, and economic and financial measures.

Speakers

Chang Huh has been serving as the Deputy Minister for International Affairs of the Ministry of Economy and Finance since February 2020. He has worked in various capacities both at home and abroad, including serving as the Director General for the Development Finance Bureau from 2018 to 2020 and as the Senior Director for the International Economic Policy Division from 2012 to 2013. Dr. Huh has also worked at the OECD as the Minister of the Permanent Delegation of the Republic of Korea (2015-2018) and at the Asian Development Bank (ADB) as an advisor to the Executive Director of the Korean Office (2004-2005). He majored in International Economics at Seoul National University and received a Ph.D. in Economics from I.E.P. de Paris in July 2003.

Hee-Kwon Jung has been serving as the Director-General for the International Cooperation Bureau of the Ministry of Science and ICT since November 2019. He also served as the President of the Seoul Office of Central Radio Management Service of the Ministry of Science and ICT from 2018 to 2019. From 2014 to 2016, he worked as the Director of the Public-Private Joint Task Force for the Creative Economy on the Presidential Advisory Council for Science and Technology and held positions in the S&T Innovation Division, S&T Strategy Division, and S&T Policy Division of the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning. From 2009 to 2011, he was seconded to the OECD. In 2007, he worked as the Director of the Technology Innovation System Division of the Ministry of Science and Technology. He graduated from Seoul National University, majoring in International Economics, and acquired an M.A in Public Administration from the University of Missouri.

Moran Ki is a professor in the Department of Cancer Control and Population Health at the National Cancer Center Graduate School of Cancer Science and Policy (NCC-GCSP). Her expertise lies in infectious disease epidemiology and global health. She worked as a professor in the Department of Preventive Medicine at Eulji University from 1998 to 2013 and served as the Dean of Eulji University’s Graduate School of Public Health from 2005 to 2008 and again from 2011 to 2013. She received her Ph.D. from Hanyang University’s College of Medicine. She also received an M.P.H. in Public Health from Seoul National University and an M.D. in medicine from Hanyang University.

 

Moderator

Yonho Kim is Associate Research Professor of Practice and Associate Director of GW Institute for Korean Studies. He specializes in North Korea’s mobile telecommunications and U.S. policy towards North Korea. Kim is the author of North Korea’s Mobile Telecommunications and Private Transportation Services in the Kim Jong-un Era (2019) and Cell Phones in North Korea: Has North Korea Entered the Telecommunications Revolution? (2014). His research findings were covered by various media outlets, including Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, Yonhap News, and Libération. Prior to joining GWIKS, he extensively interacted with the Washington policy circle on the Korean peninsula as Senior Researcher of the U.S.-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, Senior Reporter for Voice of America’s Korean Service, and Assistant Director of the Atlantic Council’s Program on Korea in Transition. He holds a B.A. and M.A. in International Relations from Seoul National University, and an M.A. in International Relations and International Economics from Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies.

Registered guests will receive the following confirmation email with details for joining the WebEx event.

This event is on the record and open to the public.

The Korea Policy Forum is made possible by a generous grant provided by the KDI School of Public Policy and Management.

1/22 “Baby Miles”: Reproductive Rights, Labor, and Ethics in the Transnational Korean Reproductive Technology Industry

The GW Institute for Korean Studies & Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program Present:

Lecture Series

“Baby Miles”: Reproductive Rights, Labor, and Ethics
in the Transnational Korean Reproductive Technology Industry

Speaker

Sunhye Kim, Assistant Research Professor of International Affairs and Postdoctoral Fellow, GW Institute for Korean Studies

Moderator

    Jisoo M. Kim, Director, GW Institute for Korean Studies

Date & Time

Wednesday, January 20, 2020
2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Location

Room 505, Elliott School of International Affairs,
the George Washington University, 1957 E Street, NW, Washington, DC 20052

RSVP

Event Description

This research project examines the transnational circuits of the assisted reproductive technology (ART) industry in South Korea to demonstrate how the concepts of reproductive rights and labor have been contested, negotiated, and reconstructed by various actors—including infertile couples, gamete donors, gestational surrogates, state agents, and medical professionals—across national boundaries. This study envisions reproductive ethics as part of a transnational feminist agenda by examining the ethical issues raised by the complicated relationships between intended parents and gamete donors/gestational surrogates. Drawing on three years of multi-sited ethnographic research conducted in South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, and Ukraine, this project disputes the unilateral understanding of ART, which is typically conceptualized as having a unidirectional flow from the “West” to Asia, by focusing on the complex relations between Korean intended parents and non-Korean gamete providers and gestational surrogates.

Speaker

Sunhye Kim is Assistant Research Professor of International Affairs and Postdoctoral Fellow at the Institute for Korean Studies at GW. Her research and teaching focus on the politics of human (re)production, technology and gender, family and labor, cross-border medical tourism, and qualitative methods. She is also interested in Korean women’s movements and transnational feminism. She has published several journal articles and book chapters in English and Korean related to population policy, biomedical technology, and reproductive justice movement in English and Korean. She received her Ph.D. in the Department of Women’s Studies at the University of Maryland and earned her M.A. and B.A. in the Department of Sociology at Yonsei University. She is currently working on a book manuscript that examines how the concepts of reproductive rights and labor have been contested and negotiated by various actors—including infertile couples, gamete donors/gestational surrogates, state agents, and medical professionals—across national boundaries.

Moderator

jk

Jisoo M. Kim is Korea Foundation Associate Professor of History, International Affairs, and East Asian Languages and Literatures and Director of the Institute for Korean Studies at GW. She received her Ph.D. in Korean History from Columbia University. She is a specialist in gender and legal history of early modern Korea. Her broader research interests include gender and sexuality, crime and justice, forensic medicine, literary representations of the law, history of emotions, vernacular, and gender writing. She is the author of The Emotions of Justice: Gender, Status, and Legal Performance in Chosŏn Korea (University of Washington Press, 2015), which was awarded the 2017 James Palais Prize of the Association for Asian Studies. She is also the co-editor of The Great East Asian War and the Birth of the Korean Nation by JaHyun Kim Haboush (Columbia University Press, 2016). She is currently working on two book projects titled Suspicious Deaths: Forensic Medicine, Dead Bodies, and Criminal Justice in Chosŏn Korea and Sexual Desire and Gendered Subjects: Decriminalization of Adultery Law in Korean History.

This event is open to public and on the record.

12/6 The Crisis that Has Defied Five Presidents: Covering the North Korean Nuclear Program for Three Decades

GWIKS NRC

The GW Institute for Korean Studies & the East Asia National Resource Center Present:

Korea Policy Forum

“The Crisis that Has Defied Five Presidents:
Covering the North Korean Nuclear Program for Three Decades”

Speaker

David E. Sanger, National Security Correspondent and Senior Writer, The New York Times

Moderator

    Yonho Kim, Associate Director, the GW Institute for Korean Studies

Date & Time

Friday, December 6, 2019
12:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Location

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602,
Elliott School of International Affairs, the George Washington University
1957 E Street, NW, Washington, DC 20052

RSVP

Event Description

The North Korean nuclear drama often seems like a movie in constant re-runs: A set of actions in Pyongyang creates a crisis; the crisis generates threats and sanctions, and then a spate of diplomacy as one American president after another promises to deal with the problem, once and for all. And yet, for all the noise, the North Koreans appear to be on a steady track toward building their nuclear arsenal, and the missile capability to deliver it. David E. Sanger, who has covered these issues since the late 1980’s, talks about what is the same now and what is quite different—and poses the question of whether there is a way out of this continuous loop. He will also address the North’s growing cyber capability, and why it offers the country leverage and capability that nuclear weapons do not.

Speaker

David E. Sanger is a national security correspondent and a senior writer. In a 36-year reporting career for The New York Times, he has been on three teams that have won Pulitzer Prizes, most recently in 2017 for international reporting. His newest book, The Perfect Weapon: War, Sabotage and Fear in the Cyber Age, examines the emergence of cyber-conflict as the primary way large and small states are competing and undercutting each other, changing the nature of global power. He is also the author of two Times best sellers on foreign policy and national security: The Inheritance: The World Obama Confronts and the Challenges to American Power, published in 2009, and Confront and Conceal: Obama’s Secret Wars and Surprising Use of American Power, published in 2012. For The Times, Mr. Sanger has served as Tokyo bureau chief, Washington economic correspondent, White House correspondent during the Clinton and Bush administrations, and Chief Washington correspondent. 

Moderator

Yonho Kim is Associate Research Professor of Practice and Associate Director of GW Institute for Korean Studies. He specializes in North Korea’s mobile telecommunications and U.S. policy towards North Korea. Kim is the author of North Korea’s Mobile Telecommunications and Private Transportation Services in the Kim Jong-un Era (2019) and Cell Phones in North Korea: Has North Korea Entered the Telecommunications Revolution? (2014). His research findings were covered by various media outlets, including Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, Yonhap News, and Libération. Prior to joining GWIKS, he extensively interacted with the Washington policy circle on the Korean peninsula as Senior Researcher of the U.S.-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, Senior Reporter for Voice of America’s Korean Service, and Assistant Director of the Atlantic Council’s Program on Korea in Transition. He holds a B.A. and M.A. in International Relations from Seoul National University, and an M.A. in International Relations and International Economics from Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies.

This event is open to public and on the record.

11/5 Ernest Bethell and the Great Game in Korea

GW Institute for Korean Studies

GWIKS Special Talk Series

“Ernest Bethell and the Great Game in Korea”

Ernest Bethell (1872-1909)

Speaker

John Burton, Washington Columnist, Korea Times

Date & Time

Tuesday, November 5, 2019
2:30 pm – 4:00 pm

Location

Room 505
Elliott School of International Affairs, the George Washington University
1957 E Street, NW, Washington, DC 20052

RSVP

Event Description

Ernest Bethell (1872-1909) was the first foreign journalist to be based in Korea and is considered one of the founders of modern Korean journalism, along with Soh Jai-pil. He came to Korea in 1904 as a young Englishman, took up the cause of Korean independence against Japanese annexation by founding a newspaper, and ultimately paid the price by being betrayed by his own government in the name of great power politics, which led to his early death. His story provides insights into how newspapers contributed to the rise of Korean nationalism amid the clash of contending imperial powers for control of the country. The lecture will also examine the role of propaganda and disinformation in setting the political agenda and the manipulation of media outlets by foreign governments.

 

Speaker

John Burton is an award-winning journalist. He is currently a Washington columnist for the Korea Times and previously was Seoul Bureau Chief for the Financial Times for nearly a decade. He also worked as a foreign correspondent in Singapore, Tokyo and Stockholm for the Financial Times and other publications. He is a three-time recipient of the Society of Publishers in Asia (SOFA) journalism awards and is a former president of the Seoul Foreign Correspondents’ Club. He majored in East Asian Studies at George Washington University.

 

 

 

Moderator

Yonho Kim is Associate Research Professor of Practice and Associate Director of GW Institute for Korean Studies. He specializes in North Korea’s mobile telecommunications and U.S. policy towards North Korea. Kim is the author of North Korea’s Mobile Telecommunications and Private Transportation Services in the Kim Jong-un Era (2019) and Cell Phones in North Korea: Has North Korea Entered the Telecommunications Revolution? (2014). His research findings were covered by various media outlets, including Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, Yonhap News, and Libération. Prior to joining GWIKS, he extensively interacted with the Washington policy circle on the Korean peninsula as Senior Researcher of the U.S.-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, Senior Reporter for Voice of America’s Korean Service, and Assistant Director of the Atlantic Council’s Program on Korea in Transition. He holds a B.A. and M.A. in International Relations from Seoul National University, and an M.A. in International Relations and International Economics from Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies.

 

This event is open to public and on the record.

11/2 The 27th Annual Hahn Moo-Sook Colloquium in the Korean Humanities

The 27th Annual Hahn Moo-Sook Colloquium in the Korean Humanities

 “Consuming K-Pop: Soft Power, Marketization, and Cultural Appropriation

Korean popular culture is arguably one of South Korea’s most impactful exports, reaching a worldwide audience of devoted fans through strategic marketization. From music, film, television, sports to food, the “Korean Wave” (hallyu) has generated revenue and reshaped the topography of the global cultural landscape. This year’s Colloquium focuses on the K-Pop industry, the contemporary style of Korean pop music that has become popular in countries ranging from Indonesia and Thailand to Pakistan, Nigeria, and Chile. The speakers will examine diverse aspects of K-Pop: state-initiated efforts to employ the Korean Wave as a currency of soft power, corporate infrastructure, global fan practices that contribute to the transnational flow of popular culture, cultural appropriation, the production of idols, and the connections between K-Pop and Korean diasporic as well as other non-Korean communities.

Date & Time
Saturday, November 2, 2019
9:30 am – 4:45 pm

Location
Harry Harding Auditorium, Room 213, Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E St., NW, Washington, DC 20052

Registration is now closed.

Program Download (PDF)

Abstract Download (PDF)

 

Program Details 

Keynote Speaker

Kyung Hyun Kim, University of California, Irvine

Speakers

Bora Kim, Columbia University
CedarBough Saeji, Indiana University
Crystal Anderson, George Mason University
Imelda Ibarra, US BTS Army
Robert Ku, Binghamton University – State University of New York (SUNY)
So-Rim Lee, University of Pennsylvania

Schedule

09:30 – 09:50  Breakfast Reception

Welcoming Remarks

09:50 – 10:00  Director Jisoo M. Kim, Institute for Korean Studies, the George Washington University

Keynote Speech

10:00 – 10:30  Kyung Hyun Kim, “Of Mimicry and Miguk: Opaquely Racial/Ambivalently Hegemonic K-pop”

Session I (Moderator: Immanuel Kim)

10:30 – 11:00  CedarBough Saeji, “Parasitic or Symbiotic?: The Rise of the K-pop Adjacent Industries”
11:00 – 11:30  So-Rim Lee, “Grow Stars with Z-POP DREAM”: Idols, Cryptocurrency, and Technologies of Embodiment”
11:30 – 12:00  Comments and Q&A

12:00 – 13:30 Lunch

Session II (Moderator: Miok D. Pak)

13:30 – 14:00  Robert Ku, “Mother Said She Didn’t Like Jajangmyeon’: Ruminating on Korean Noodles During the Age of K-pop”
14:00 – 14:30  Crystal Anderson, “From Big Mama to Mamamoo: The Reverberation of R&B Vocals in K-pop Girl Groups”
14:30 – 15:00  Comments and Q&A

15:00 – 15:15  Break

Session III  (Moderator: Gregg Brazinsky)

15:15 – 15:45  Bora Kim, “Boundaries of K-pop: EXP EDITION, A Non-Korean K-pop Idol Group”
15:45 – 16:15  Imelda Ibarra, “Method to the Madness: The Global Power of ARMY”
16:15 – 16:45  General Comments

The George Washington University’s Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures and the Institute for Korean Studies gratefully acknowledge our co-sponsors:

GW Sigur Center for Asian Studies
Korea Foundation
Literature Translation Institute of Korea

*Please note that K-Pop stars in any promotion materials are not attending this event.

Cover Photo ©Korea Tourism Organization

Prospects for a Nuclear Deal with North Korea

10/14 Prospects for a Nuclear Deal with North Korea

GWIKS NRC

The GW Institute for Korean Studies & the East Asia National Resource Center Present:

 

Korea Policy Forum

“Prospects for a Nuclear Deal with North Korea”

Speaker

Ambassador Joseph Yun, Senior Advisor, the U.S. Institute of Peace

Date & Time

Monday, October 14, 2019
3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Location

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
Elliott School of International Affairs, the George Washington University
1957 E Street, NW, Washington, DC 20052

 

Registration is now closed.

The event will be livestreamed at https://go.gwu.edu/koreapolicyforum1014live

Event Description

Less than four months ago, U.S. President Donald Trump briefly set foot in North Korea, becoming the first sitting U.S. president to do so. This was the third meeting between Trump and Kim in twelve months, an unimaginable development for Americans and Koreans alike. Ambassador Joseph Yun, former U.S. Representative for North Korea Policy (2016-18), will discuss whether these Trump-Kim meetings are just photo-ops or if they could lead to an agreement that will denuclearize North Korea and thus change the Korean Peninsula and the region.

Speaker

Ambassador Yun, recognized as one of the nation’s leading experts on relations with North Korea, as well as broader U.S.-East Asia policy, most recently served as Special Representative for North Korea Policy. Currently, he is Senior Advisor with The Asia Group, a DC-based strategic consulting firm, and the U.S. Institute of Peace, an independent and non-partisan federal institute working on peace and reconciliation issues throughout the globe. He is also a Global Affairs Commentator for the CNN. Yun’s 33-year diplomatic career has been marked by his commitment to face-to-face engagement as the best avenue for resolving conflict and advancing cross-border cooperation. As Special Representative on North Korea from 2016 to 2018, Ambassador Yun led the U.S. efforts to align regional powers behind a united policy to denuclearize North Korea. He was instrumental in reopening the “New York channel,” a direct communication line with officials from Pyongyang. As Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for East Asian and Pacific Affairs (2011-2013), Yun led efforts to normalize diplomatic relations with Myanmar. Yun also served as Ambassador to Malaysia (2013-16). Before joining the Foreign Service, Yun was a senior economist for Data Resources, Inc., in Lexington, Massachusetts. He holds a M. Phil. degree from the London School of Economics and a BS from the University of Wales.

Welcoming Remarks

jk

Jisoo M. Kim is Korea Foundation Associate Professor of History, International Affairs, and East Asian Languages and Literatures and Director of the Institute for Korean Studies at GW. She received her Ph.D. in Korean History from Columbia University. She is a specialist in gender and legal history of early modern Korea. Her broader research interests include gender and sexuality, crime and justice, forensic medicine, literary representations of the law, history of emotions, vernacular, and gender writing. She is the author of The Emotions of Justice: Gender, Status, and Legal Performance in Chosŏn Korea (University of Washington Press, 2015), which was awarded the 2017 James Palais Prize of the Association for Asian Studies. She is also the co-editor of The Great East Asian War and the Birth of the Korean Nation by JaHyun Kim Haboush (Columbia University Press, 2016). She is currently working on two book projects titled Suspicious Deaths: Forensic Medicine, Dead Bodies, and Criminal Justice in Chosŏn Korea and Sexual Desire and Gendered Subjects: Decriminalization of Adultery Law in Korean History.

Moderator

Yonho Kim is Associate Research Professor of Practice and Associate Director of GW Institute for Korean Studies. He specializes in North Korea’s mobile telecommunications and U.S. policy towards North Korea. Kim is the author of North Korea’s Mobile Telecommunications and Private Transportation Services in the Kim Jong-un Era (2019) and Cell Phones in North Korea: Has North Korea Entered the Telecommunications Revolution? (2014). His research findings were covered by various media outlets, including Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, Yonhap News, and Libération. Prior to joining GWIKS, he extensively interacted with the Washington policy circle on the Korean peninsula as Senior Researcher of the U.S.-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, Senior Reporter for Voice of America’s Korean Service, and Assistant Director of the Atlantic Council’s Program on Korea in Transition. He holds a B.A. and M.A. in International Relations from Seoul National University, and an M.A. in International Relations and International Economics from Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies.

 

This event is open to public and on the record.

10/1 U.S.-China Strategic Rivalry and the Korean Peninsula

GWIKS NRC

The GW Institute for Korean Studies & the East Asia National Resource Center Present:

 

Korea Policy Forum

“U.S.-China Strategic Rivalry and the Korean Peninsula”

Speakers

Heung-Kyu Kim, Ajou University
Scott Synder, Council on Foreign Relations
Jiyong Zheng, Fudan University

Date & Time

Tuesday, October 1, 2019
2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Location

Room 505
Elliott School of International Affairs, the George Washington University
1957 E Street, NW, Washington, DC 20052

 

 

Registration for this event has been closed because we have reached the maximum number of registrations for the event.

The event will be live-streamed. To join us: https://go.gwu.edu/KoreaPolicyForum1001Live 

 

 

Event Description

In recent years, the U.S. and China have been engaged in the strategic rivalry on both the security and economic fronts with the rise of China and the Trump administration’s new approach to U.S.-China relations. The Korean peninsula is facing growing uncertainties as the competition between the two great powers intensifies in the region. South Korea seeks autonomy while upgrading its traditional alliance with the U.S., whereas North Korea strives for a new relationship with the U.S. with strengthened ties with China. How will the changing strategic equations surrounding the Korean peninsula impact the security and prosperity in the region? The Korea Policy Forum at GWIKS will bring together three experts from South Korea, the U.S., and China to answer the question and discuss the strategic choices and paths for the Korean peninsula.

 

Speakers

Heung-Kyu Kim is the founder and Director of China Policy Institute and professor in the department of political science at Ajou University, South Korea. He also served as a professor at the Institute of Foreign Affairs and National Security, South Korea’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs. His current assignments include Director of Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on the Presidential Commission on Policy-Planning, Team Leader of Security and Defense in the Presidential Task Force of Future Vision 2045, a board member of the National Security Council and a board member of National Defense Reform Commission, Ministry of National Defense. Kim has written more than 300 articles, books, and policy papers regarding Chinese politics and foreign policy, and security issues in Northeast Asia. They include China and the U.S.-ROK Alliance: Promoting a Trilateral Dialogue (CFR, 2017), Enemy, Homager or Equal Partner?: Evolving Korea-China Relations (2012), From a Buffer Zone to a Strategic Burden: Evolving Sino-North Korea Relations during Hu Jintao Era (2010). His book China’s Central-Local Relations and Decision-Making received an award for Excellency of the Year by the Ministry of Culture in 2008. He also received the NEAR Foundation Academic prize of the year in the area of foreign policy and security in 2014. Kim received his BA and MA in international relations from Seoul National University, South Korea, and Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Michigan.

 

Scott A. Snyder is a senior fellow for Korea studies and director of the program on U.S.-Korea policy at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR). His program examines South Korea’s efforts to contribute on the international stage; its potential influence and contributions as a middle power in East Asia; and the peninsular, regional, and global implications of North Korean instability. Mr. Snyder is the author of South Korea at the Crossroads: Autonomy and Alliance in an Era of Rival Powers (January 2018) and coauthor of The Japan-South Korea Identity Clash: East Asian Security and the United States (May 2015) with Brad Glosserman. He is also the coeditor of North Korea in Transition: Politics, Economy, and Society (October 2012), and the editor of Global Korea: South Korea’s Contributions to International Security (October 2012) and The U.S.-South Korea Alliance: Meeting New Security Challenges (March 2012). Mr. Snyder served as the project director for CFR’s Independent Task Force on policy toward the Korean Peninsula. He currently writes for the blog Asia Unbound.

 

Jiyong Zheng currently serves as Professor and Director at the Center for Korean Studies, Fudan University, and Secretary-General of Shanghai Institute of Korean Studies. Zheng Jiyong joined the army and studied at the School of Foreign Languages, the Chinese People’s Liberation Army. In 1991, he was assigned to research the military and diplomacy of the Korean Peninsula. In 2009, he retired from the army and joined Fudan University. He received his Doctoral Degree at Fudan University and has had post-doctoral experiences at IFES, Kyungnam University, ROK(2009/09-2010/12) and in Kim Il Sung University, DPRK(2014/07-11), and was a visiting scholar in Seoul National University, ROK(2016/09-2017/09), and is currently a Visiting Scholar in The Henry L. Stimson Center. His research focuses on domestic politics in the two Koreas, and on bilateral and multilateral relations related to the Korean peninsula, and policy-making process in DPRK, China, and ROK. He is the author and co-author of more than 100 scholarly articles and author or editor of more than 10 books, including ROK’s Political Party Systems (2008), ROK’s Parliamentary Politics (2017), North Korea: Peace? Nuclear War? (2019), The “Conflict-Reconciliation” Cycle on the Korean Peninsula: A Chinese Perspective (2012), and Road Map to a Korean Peninsula Peace Regime: A Chinese Perspective (2015).

 

Moderator

jkJisoo M. Kim is Korea Foundation Associate Professor of History, International Affairs, and East Asian Languages and Literatures and Director of the Institute for Korean Studies at GW. She received her Ph.D. in Korean History from Columbia University. She is a specialist in gender and legal history of early modern Korea. Her broader research interests include gender and sexuality, crime and justice, forensic medicine, literary representations of the law, history of emotions, vernacular, and gender writing. She is the author of The Emotions of Justice: Gender, Status, and Legal Performance in Chosŏn Korea (University of Washington Press, 2015), which was awarded the 2017 James Palais Prize of the Association for Asian Studies. She is also the co-editor of The Great East Asian War and the Birth of the Korean Nation by JaHyun Kim Haboush (Columbia University Press, 2016). She is currently working on two book projects titled Suspicious Deaths: Forensic Medicine, Dead Bodies, and Criminal Justice in Chosŏn Korea and Sexual Desire and Gendered Subjects: Decriminalization of Adultery Law in Korean History.

 

This event is open to public and on the record.

2019 Summer Study Abroad Program

GWIKS’s third two-week summer study abroad program in Seoul, South Korea ended on July 6, 2019 under the lead of Professor. Jisoo M. Kim and Professor. Insung Ko. During the program, eight GW students explored past, present and future of Korea through four main themes of Korean identities, culture, division, and reunification.

Students had the welcoming dinner and orientation on June 23, 2019 at the restaurant in Jongno, Seoul, and met with two instructors. During this two-week compact summer program, students were able to integrate readings, discussions, on-site lectures, and site-visits in learning Korean history, politics, film, and media.

For the first few days, students explored Korea’s past starting from the birth of the Joseon dynasty up to the modern times. They visited Kwanghwamun, Gyeongbok Palace, National Museum of Korea and Hangeul Museum to learn Korea’s history of dynastic kingdom. Students could also explore Korea’s 20th century history when visiting Seoul Museum of History, Seodaemun Prison, and National Museum of Korean Contemporary History. Through a tour in Demilitarized Zone (DMZ), students could see how one country divided into North and South.

The present of Korea was reflected through site visits to Ajou Institute for Unification, Korean Film Council, Constitutional Court of Korea, Korean National Diplomatic Academy, and MBC World. During these visits, students could incorporate their knowledge in various disciplines, such as politics, film, media and entertainment. At Hana Foundation, students had a workshop with North Korean defector students, where they discussed unification of Korea.

Towards the end of the program, students presented their experience in Korea based on this two-week summer study abroad program. The Students’ portfolio presentations of summer 2018 can be found here.

9/27 Film Screening, “Shusenjo: The Main Battleground of the Comfort Women Issue”

Sigur Center for Asian Studies, Institute for Korean Studies,
the Global Women’s Institute, & Memory and Reconciliation in the Asia-Pacific

present:

Film Screening Event
“Shusenjo:
The Main Battleground of the Comfort Women Issue”

Date & Time
Friday, September 27, 2019
4:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Location
Room 602, Lindner Family Commons,
Elliott School of International Affairs, The Geroge Washington University
1957 E Street, NW. Washington, DC 20052

Registration is Now Closed.

Synopsis

The “comfort women” issue is perhaps Japan’s most contentious present-day diplomatic quandary. Inside Japan, the issue is dividing the country across clear ideological lines. Supporters and detractors of “comfort women” are caught in a relentless battle over empirical evidence, the validity of oral testimony, the number of victims, the meaning of sexual slavery, and the definition of coercive recruitment. Credibility, legitimacy and influence serve as the rallying cry for all those involved in the battle. In addition, this largely domestic battleground has been shifted to the international arena, commanding the participation of various state and non-state actors and institutions from all over the world.  This film delves deep into the most contentious debates and uncovers the hidden intentions of the supporters and detractors of comfort women. Most importantly it finds answers to some of the biggest questions for Japanese and Koreans: Were comfort women prostitutes or sex slaves? Were they coercively recruited?  And, does Japan have a legal responsibility to apologize to the former comfort women?

 

Director

Miki Dezaki is a recent graduate of the Graduate Program in Global Studies at Sophia University in Tokyo.  He worked for the Japan Exchange Teaching Program for five years in Yamanashi and Okinawa before becoming a Buddhist monk in Thailand for one year.  He is also known as “Medamasensei” on Youtube, where he has made comedy videos and videos on social issues in Japan. His most notable video is “Racism in Japan,” which led to numerous online attacks by Japanese neo-nationalists who attempted to deny the existence of racism and discrimination against Zainichi Koreans (Koreans with permanent residency in Japan) and Burakumin (historical outcasts still discriminated today). “Shusenjo” is his directorial debut.

 

This event is on the record, and open to the public.

Photo credit to No Man Productions, LLC.

9/12 2019 Mid-Autumn Festival Celebration

 Celebrate 2019 Mid-Autumn Festival

On Thursday, September 12, 2019, the GW Confucius Institute will celebrate the 2019 Mid-Autumn Festival in the GW Confucius Institute townhouse. Guests will have the chance to taste traditional holiday treats, mooncakes, and network with others interested in China and other Asian cultures. There will be materials available for you to hear about learning Chinese language and study abroad opportunities in Asia.

Date & Time

Thursday, September 12, 2019
5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.

Location

GW Confucius Institute, 2147 F Street, NW, Washington, DC 20052

RSVP

Sponsored By:

The GW Confucius Institute
The GW Institute for Korean Studies
The GW Language Center
The Sigur Center for Asian Studies
The GW Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures

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